Lesson IV

Another busy lesson. Once the students are dressed; warmup, review the footwork from the earlier lessons, then demonstrate and work on crossovers. Review, with a line drill, direct attacks, 'high line' parries, and ripostes.
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Introduce and demonstrate disengages. At the same time discuss 'simple' 'direct' and indirect attacks. Explain their simularities of tempo. Again, line drill; disengages, and then disengage-attacks (indirect attacks).
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Introduce and explain compound attacks. Demonstrate feints. Again discuss simple and compound attacks, explaining the differences, especially the difference between disengage attack and feint-disengage attack. Get the line moving again and have the students focus on the differences between disengage attacks (simple) and feint-disengage attacks (compound). Discuss the idea of creating an opening by threatening in one line with a feint, then disengaging to the other line for the attack (compound). Point out that this notion, of drawing a response so that one can take advantage of it, is the heart and soul of fencing, that thinking and technique will defeat "bigger, stronger, faster" actions.
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Finally, spend a short time talking about the role of the referee in fencing. Explain their duties and responsibilities and the courtesy owed them. Go briefly into the dimensions and rules concerning the strip. Call for two volunteers, set them on the strip, and officiate a bout between them. Explain your calls. Allow as many pairs to fence as you can make time. Schedule time. They are fencing.
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Four weeks to learn fencing? Hardly. But this is the beginning. The students are fencing within their knowledge and abilities. They have a long way to go and more techniques to learn. But the basic tools of offense, defense, and strategy are theirs to use. Fan the flames!
coach & student
Student with Coach
coach & student
fencing!